• Nanion Technologies: Smart Tools for Ion Channel Research

    Nanion Technologies: Smart Tools for Ion Channel Research

  • SyncroPatch 384i: HTS Automated Patch Clamp

    SyncroPatch 384i: HTS Automated Patch Clamp

  • SURFE²R 96SE: Label-free HTS Transporter Screening

    SURFE²R 96SE: Label-free HTS Transporter Screening

  • Dynamic Clamp: Patchliner

    Dynamic Clamp: Patchliner

  • Bilayer recordings: Orbit product family

    Bilayer recordings: Orbit product family

  • CardioExcyte 96 SOL: Pacing Cardiomyocytes with Light

    CardioExcyte 96 SOL: Pacing Cardiomyocytes with Light

Our Product Portfolio

SyncroPatch 384

SyncroPatch 384

Patchliner

Patchliner

Port-a-Patch

Port-a-Patch

Port-a-Patch mini

Port-a-Patch mini

CardioExcyte 96

CardioExcyte 96

FLEXcyte 96

FLEXcyte 96

SURFE²R 96SE

SURFE²R 96SE

SURFE²R N1

SURFE²R N1

Orbit 16 TC

Orbit 16 TC

Orbit Mini

Orbit Mini

Vesicle Prep Pro

Vesicle Prep Pro

Buffer Solution

Buffer Solution

BRAIN AG - Cell Line Provider

Collaborative Activities with BRAIN AG

01 BRAIN Logo schwarz auf weiss CMYK 300dpi

BRAIN AG is a pioneer of industrial biotechnology. The company creates innovative solutions by combining a broad and in-depth biotechnology portfolio with a comprehensive proprietary resource of natural solutions: The “BioArchive“ encompasses high-performance microorganisms, natural compounds, fractions obtained from edible plant material, metagenome and enzyme libraries, as well as complete metabolic paths including previously uncultivable organisms.

BRAIN'S “BioActives & Performance Proteins" technology unit focuses on the identification and development of novel bioactive compounds for the food, feed and cosmetic industries. BRAIN employs state-of-the-art technologies to evaluate novel molecular targets and to engineer proprietary 2D as well as 3D cell-based model systems enabling high-troughput screenings using various physiological readouts.

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National Research Council of Canada

NRC Canada 

The National Research Council of Canada (NRC) is the Government of Canada's largest research and technology organization supporting industrial innovation, the advancement of knowledge as well as technology development. Nanion Technologies and the NRC work together collaboratively on advancing applications of high-throughput electrophysiology for screening and development of therapies for diseases affecting or implicating ion channels.

The centrepiece of this effort is Nanion’s SyncroPatch 384PE system, a 384-channel high-throughput automatic patch-clamp, installed at the NRC’s Human Health Therapeutics Research Centre in Ottawa, Canada, in the laboratories of the Electrophysiology Team led by Dr. Marzia Martina. This is the only such instrument available in Canada. Dr. Martina’s team, with close support from Nanion, is developing protocols and methods for screening antibody and small molecule therapeutic libraries for ion channel-modulating activity using this system.

In particular, the Nanion SyncroPatch 384PE will be pivotal in a collaboration between the NRC and the Children Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO, Ottawa, Canada) to discover disease-modifying treatments for the childhood epilepsy known as Dravet syndrome (DS). DS is the archetypal Early-onset Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy and it is estimated that 80-85% of individuals with a clinical diagnosis of DS have a mutation in the voltage gated sodium channel encoding gene SCN1A (Nav1.1). To select and repurpose drugs that can mitigate DS, a library of blood-brain-penetrant FDA-approved drugs curated by CHEO, will be screened to select a set of potential candidates that  target the ion channel mutation-specific form of epilepsy. Using SyncroPatch 384PE, the effects of these mutations will be studied on the functionality of the ion channels in (i) HEK293 cells transfected with the mutated channels and (ii) in neurons (iNs) differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from DS patients’ fibroblasts.  SyncroPatch 384PE will then be used to screen the CHEO-curated library of blood-brain-penetrant FDA-approved drugs to identify potential therapeutics.

Project Summary

Improved Treatment Options for Children with Dravet Syndrome

Dravet Syndrome (DS) is an early-onset disorder associated with increased mortality and significant cognitive, behavioral and developmental deficits. Unfortunately, treatment options for DS and other early-onset encephalopathies are limited.

Mutations of the sodium channel (Nav) gene SCN1A, coding for Nav1.1 – which are responsible for the vast majority of DS. SCN1A DS-causing mutations in individuals from Ottawa and across Canada – have been identified by a national rare disease network (Care4Rare Research Consortium). The NRC and Dr. Martina’s Electrophysiology Team, in collaboration with the CHEO and Dr. David Dyment (Associate Professor at University of Ottawa and Tier 2 Clinical Research Chair in Translational Epilepsy Research, Pediatrics-CHEO), aim to identify novel treatments for DS using the Nanion SyncroPatch 384PE to screen the CHEO-curated library of blood-brain-penetrant FDA-approved drugs to repurpose as clinically safe DS drugs. Expanding the repertoire of anti-epileptic medications by the repurposing of clinically-approved drugs could offer a hope for personalized therapy for this group of children with an unmet clinical need.

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Northwestern University - Feinberg School of Medicine

Northwestern - Feinberg School of Medicine 

The Feinberg School of Medicine is situated in the heart of Chicago and is committed to be part of a forward-thinking institution committed to improving human health through education and discovery. Research in Prof. Al George Jr.’s lab is focused on the structure, function, pharmacology and molecular genetics of ion channels. Al is an internationally recognized leader in the field of channelopathies based on his important discoveries on inherited muscle disorders (periodic paralysis, myotonia), inherited cardiac arrhythmias (congenital long-QT syndrome) and genetic epilepsies. Prof Al George’s laboratory was the first to determine the functional consequences of a human cardiac sodium channel mutation associated with an inherited cardiac arrhythmia. His group has elucidated the functional and molecular consequences of several brain sodium channel mutations that cause various familial epilepsies and an inherited form of migraine. These finding have motivated pharmacological studies designed to find compounds that suppress aberrant functional behaviors caused by mutations.

Project Summary

The SyncroPatch 768PE situated in Prof. Al George Jr.’s lab, has been used to characterize the electrophysiological properties of more than 200 variants in voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels using the SyncroPatch 768PE system, with many more in the pipeline.
Determining the functional effects of ion channel variants can help with classification as potentially disease causing or not. In their recent study of long QT syndrome type 1, the George laboratory was able to reclassify >65% of KCNQ1 (encoding KV7.1) variants of uncertain significance as likely pathogenic. Most recently, they presented a study of 80 KCNQ2 variants at the annual meeting of the American Epilepsy Society.

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Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute

Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute (IHMRI)

The Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute (IHMRI) is a not-for-profit charity that supports health and medical researchers in the Illawarra-Shoalhaven region of New South Wales, Australia. The aim of the research institute is to bring scientists, doctors and health professionals together to solve the greatest health challenges through research. IHMRI researches into better ways to prevent and treat disease and illness such as cancer, diabetes, mental illness and dementia.

The SyncroPatch 384PE is housed within the IHMRI’s Electrophysiology Facility for Cell Phenotyping and Drug Discovery (E-Phys core). The instrument is used to measure electrical activity in up to 384 single living cells at a time, and their responses to different drugs. This speeds up the process of cell analysis and significantly reduces laboratory times for researchers.

Project Summary

Since November 2018 IHMRI’s Electrophysiology Facility for Cell Phenotyping and Drug Discovery has been successfully functionally characterizing multiple cell types and screening compounds on native and recombinant ion channels using the SyncroPatch 384PE and the PatchLiner octo.

We have successfully recorded native and recombinant voltage- and ligand- responsive currents in various stem cell derived models, neuroblastoma/glioma cell lines, primary and immortalized immune cells, as well as many ion channels stably expressed in various cellular backgrounds.

The mechanical and electrical stability of the system allows for precise and fast application of compounds making Nanion’s automated patch clamp instruments invaluable tools for us.
Importantly, the team at Nanion provides outstanding customer support that is fast, knowledgeable and friendly.

Watch the video of the SyncroPatch 384PE at the IHMRI:

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Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Translational Neurobiology at the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research

The research in the group of Jen Pan, who is director of translational neurobiology at the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, focuses on translating emerging genetics into biology and to enable next-generation therapeutics to treat psychiatric illnesses. In the past few years, Pan has been working on genes whose dysfunction has been implicated for psychiatric illnesses using molecular, cellular, and electrophysiological approaches, both in vitro and in animals. Her group has expertise in the physiology of ion channels, part of the large protein family critical to neurons firing and muscles moving. She leads the ICE-T (ion channel electrophysiology and technology) effort enabled by Broadnext10 initiative to utilize state-of-art technologies for studying ion channels and electrogenic transporters, and to find novel ways to modulate these highly specialized membrane proteins.

Project Summary

The SyncroPatch 384PE is situated in the lab of Jen Pan PhD, Director, translational neurobiology at the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research and has been in heavy use since early 2016. Jen’s laboratory and collaborators are using SyncroPatch recordings to study the mechanism of action of ion channel modulators identified from high throughput FLIPR assays. In addition, her group characterized genetic variants of genes that encode voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels that are implicated in schizophrenia and neurological disorders. They developed novel methods for noise analyses using the SyncroPatch that can estimate single channel conductance and surface expression (Nanion User meeting 2019). They presented a methodology to predict gain-of-function (GOF) and loss-of-function (LOF) and then validated the model by studying 50 variants on the SyncroPatch 384 system.

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