• Orbit 16

    fully parallel recording of 16 bilayers
  • Orbit 16

    fully automated bilayer formation

2019 - Real-time monitoring β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor (BL/BLI) mixture towards the bacteria porin pathway at single molecule level

Icon Orbit   Orbit 16 publication in Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry (2019)

Authors:
Wang J., Fertig N., Ying Y.L.

Journal:
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry (2019) https://doi.org/10.1007/s00216-019-01650-3


Abstract:

Multidrug-resistant bacteria are a great concern and a problem that must be addressed. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases are a common defence mechanism of bacteria to make β-lactam (BL) antibiotics ineffective. β-Lactamase inhibitors (BLIs) are consequently designed and are often clinically prescribed with a BL antibiotic to hinder degradation. Current studies focusing on how BL antibiotics or BLIs interact solely with the bacterial outer membrane nanopores (porins) on reaching the periplasmic side using a nanopore-based sensing technique. In electrochemical studies, the bias voltage allows real-time monitoring of BL antibiotics, BLIs and their mixture through the porin pathway at the single-molecule level. Here we consider the most abundant membrane protein from Escherichia coli (i.e. OmpF), purify and reconstitute the membrane protein in an artificial lipid bilayer and then study its ex vivo electrochemical behaviour. We show the piperacillin/tazobactam mixture interacts with OmpF, whereas the substrate interacts under the maximum bandwidth. The power spectrum analysis of the ionic current trace demonstrates the ampicillin/sulbactram mixture requires more energy than ampicillin alone to pass through the porin pathway. Our results demonstrate that clinically relevant combinations (e.g. piperacillin/tazobactam and ampicillin/sulbactam) interact more strongly with OmpF than either the BL antibiotic or the BLI alone. We suggest a quick and relatively cheap screening method to test the ability of BL antibiotics/BLIs to cross the bacterial cellular membrane.


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